Time To Know Your Health Scale

Increase Awareness to Prevent Heart Disease

Do you know how healthy your heart is? In this modern world, people rarely have time to concentrate on their health. Obesity, unhealthy diet, high blood pressure, cholesterol, bad sugar levels and lack of exercise are some of the main causes for heart disease. Since World Heart Day is fast approaching, it is high time to make changes to our lifestyle and educate people about heart disease and ways to prevent it. Here are some easy and simple ways to do that:

Quit Smoking

In the United States, almost one in every five people die each year because of smoking. The chemicals in tobacco smoke not only damage blood cells, but also weaken the function of your heart and blood vessels. If you are a smoker, the best thing to do is to quit right away.

Physical Activity

Keep your body fit by doing regular exercise. Simple physical activities such as walking, running or swimming increase skeletal muscle strength. This also helps reduce blood pressure and cholesterol levels to prevent heart disease. Make it a habit and spare at least 30 minutes of your day.

Avoid Obesity

Nearly 70% of all Americans are overweight. This leads to developing health problems such as heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, diabetes and more. Hence it is a must to maintain a healthy weight. You should check with a BMI calculator at least once a year. If you are overweight, take precautionary measures like eating fewer calories than your body needs and doing aerobic exercise for 30 minutes daily.

Healthy Food Habits

Take plenty of fibrous foods such as whole-grain cereals, potatoes, and bran to help you lower the risk of heart disease. Avoid fat products. Eat more of fruits and vegetables – they are a good source of fibers, vitamins and minerals. Reduce salt as much as possible in your foods to maintain your blood pressure and sugar level under control. Include fish in your meals at least twice a week. While shopping, keep track of the calories mentioned on the food and drink labels. It is always good to know how much fat, salt and sugar the product contains. This will help you choose a diet with less calories.

Avoid Alcohol

Alcohol contains more calories. Drinking regularly and over a long period of time, can increase your blood pressure which is the main cause of heart disease. It also weakens the heart muscle, and this can lead to heart failure.

Periodical Heart Check-ups

It is important to do periodical heart check-ups like ECG and Echo tests even if you do not have health problems.

Organize Awareness Campaigns

September 29th is an important day for raising heart-health awareness. Many health organizations host events across the country to create awareness and to prevent heart disease.

You can also host campaigns in your local community and ask health care professionals, dietician and the general public participate. Arrange a group discussion where people can share their views about heart diseases, preventive measures that need to be adopted and the necessity to change unhealthy lifestyle. You can surprise the participants with cool and exciting gifts. Because they are quite popular and versatile, you can go with customized silicone wristbands. These products are trendy, cost-effective, fashionable and easily customizable. You can get them online and choose from a variety of types, colors, fonts, sizes and styles. Customizing your wristbands with messages like “Follow Healthy Habits” or “Do Regular Heart Check-ups” is a useful option to promote public awareness.

Best Way To Prevent Your Risk Of A Heart Attack

You never know when the clock will start ticking before you realize of this attack. May be your chances of survival from a war attack is much higher than a heart attack. All you need to know is what needs to be done next at this critical point of survival.

What is a Heart Attack?

  • Also known as Myocardial Infarction, Acute Myocardial Infarction, Acute Coronary Syndrome, Coronary Thrombosis & Coronary Occlusion
  • It is a result of Coronary Heart Disease – A medical condition in which plaque builds up inside the coronary arteries supplying blood to the heart
  • Plaque creates a blockage inside the artery causing less supply of blood & oxygen to the heart
  • If this oxygen rich blood flow is not restored quickly then the heart muscle will die
  • Heart attack symptoms are chest pain, or feeling of tightness in the chest, fatigue, discomfort in neck & arm, light headed ness & abnormal heartbeat
  • If not treated immediately it may lead to arrhythmias than can be fatal to life

Risk Factors or causes of a Heart Attack:

  • Unhealthy diet containing high levels of cholesterol, trans fats & saturated fats
  • Obesity
  • Physically inactive
  • Smoking
  • High blood pressure of 140/90 mmHg or above
  • High levels of Cholesterol in the blood; especially the Low Density Lipoproteins (LDL) also known as the bad cholesterol
  • High blood sugar due to diabetes
  • Family history of heart disease

Diagnostic Tests for a Heart Attack:

  • Electrocardiogram
  • Blood Test
  • Coronary angiography

Prevention of a heart attack:

A lifestyle that ensures that the heart remains healthy can prevent a heart attack. Few changes that are important in making heart healthy are as follows:

  • Eating heart healthy foods that are good for heart
  • Be physically active & exercise regularly (for at least 30 minutes)
  • Quit smoking if you are a smoker
  • Limit alcohol
  • Managing stress
  • Managing weight to avoid obesity

It is in your hand to lead a healthy lifestyle by following above simple tips and keeping eye on health status by checking your blood pressure & cholesterol levels regularly. With the prevention you should have knowledge of signs and symptoms of heart diseases to recognize it early for better treatment.

Do Chocolate Can Wonders to Reduce Heart Disease?

What are the possible factors which could help reduce heart disease? Do you know? Most people do not have any idea that the common things we use in our daily life can also do heart disease prevention. Heart disease is one of the diseases which can endanger person’s life all of a sudden as a result of heart attack or heart failure. There are hundreds of reasons for a sudden heart failure in people no matter what age they are of.

Chocolate!

One of the most commonly used things is the delicious chocolate used by every other human being at least once in a month in one form or another. If people know about the importance of this important ingredient they would definitely increase its use to do heart problem prevention in their lives. Doctors recommend people to do chocolate consumption on daily basis in any form to prevent cardiac diseases. Dark Chocolate is significantly recommended since it contains large amount of nutrients which are good for a person’s health. It contains antioxidants which help reduce heart diseases. It has abundance of fiber, magnesium, iron and potassium which have the ability of heart disease prevention. Knowing about the heart disease prevention diet is very important these days, since the heart disease is widespread in almost every country of the world.

Chocolate maintains a good blood flow

One of the most important reasons of using chocolate for heart problem prevention is its ability to smooth en the blood flow in a person’s body. It not only smooth ens the blood flow but also lowers the blood pressure which becomes the main reason for the heart attack in most of the cases. Cocoa has bio active elements in it which accelerates yet smooth ens the blood flow in the arteries and ultimately results in lowering the blood pressure. The anti-oxidation elements in Cocoa restricts the cholesterol to get accumulated in the arteries which becomes another big reason of a heart attack. In this modern world, cocoa is considered as a medicine to ensure better cardiovascular health. It does not only have a magnificent taste but it has large healthy benefits for a human body. People should use the diet which reduces heart disease risk and contribute to heart disease prevention and treatment. People should follow heart disease prevention tips to avoid cardiovascular mishaps in their body.

Other ways to reduce

The smooth functioning of a human body is essential for a health life and this article will tell you about the heart disease prevention to some extent. The smooth blood circulation in the body is essential for a smooth functioning of heart which can only be made possible through using diet.

Reduce heart disease through intake of healthy foods

Over weight of body do not result to reduce heart problem but oppositely is complementary to cause it. Mostly people with more weight have to experience the heart disease which can become deathly if not taken care of properly at appropriate time through right heart prevention tips. In most of the cases, the doctors’ recommendations include the reduction of weight in the heart disease treatment. They pressurizes the patient to reduce his weight to help burn the calories and reduce the cholesterol level which is often the main reason of cardiovascular diseases.
• The patients with heart diseases should take healthy diet including rich amount of whole grains which is mostly present in brown rice and bread.
• Olive Oil should be made a significant ingredient of the food.
• He should eat sea food on regular basis instead of red meat which is not so healthy for any human body if consumed in abundance.
• There are many brands available which offers low fat or fat-free dairy products. To prevent the health disease one should make the low fat eatables an important food on regular basis.
• Sodium is not good since it increases the blood pressure. That’s why whatever that has rich sodium in it should be avoided.
• Fruits should be taken in abundance.
• Fried food should be avoided and preferably grilled or steamed food should be taken in heart prevention diet.

Exercise is best to have a healthy life!

Not only healthy foods but there are many exercises which a person can do to help. Doing exercise on daily basis, keeping your body fit and used to of a stressful activity can help a lot in dealing with the cardiac diseases and coping with them on a long term basis. What is heart made up of? It is made up of muscles which need to stretch and exercise all the time. When a person exercises, his heart starts pumping the blood all over the body and starts functioning with greater efficiency. This will keep the heart’s life to live longer. Exercise on regular basis is very important for a human body for burning calories and decreasing the amount of accumulated cholesterol. It is common to know that exercise keeps the heart flexible in pumping blood out and keeps the blood pressure normal. Doctors recommend that every person should exercise for at least 30 minutes daily to keep the body fit and healthy. Yoga and jogging at an appropriate rate of running is considered good for the heart disease prevention as well as treatment. The healthy heart burn off your stress and makes you sleep better which ultimately results in a healthy and fit life. These heart prevention tips should be adopted in his/ her life to live longer.

6 Early Warning Heart Attack

It goes down in the books as “sudden cardiac death” and it’s not at all uncommon – in fact, heart attacks are among the leading causes of death in the civilized world today. Most of their victims are men in their 40s and 50s; a third of these men are given no apparent warning. Their heart attacks strike as unexpectedly as lightning on a summer day.

Actually, of course, heart attacks hardly ever occur “out of the blue” – they’re merely the knockout punch delivered to cardiovascular system that’s already been beaten down by years of abuse. In a man whose heart is already vulnerable certain things – stress, temperature extremes, and alcohol can act as triggers that touch off a heart attack.

Researchers have identified at least six acute triggers of sudden cardiac death. They’ are the equivalent of righteous left hook to the head and knowing about them may help you learn when to duck.

1. Emotional Stress: A few years ago, researchers at Harvard and Birmingham and women’s hospital in Boston made headlines when they found that a substantial number of life threatening coronary events were triggered by acute emotional stress – in one case, a cliffhanger baseball game.

Getting all worked up emotionally can apparently touch off ventricular fibrillation, a heart arrhythmia one researcher describes as “a chaotic electrical storm” in the heart. Fibrillation turns the heart’s magnificently efficient contractions into erratic spasms, nearly destroying its ability to pump blood.

Of 117 survivors of life threatening arrhythmias questioned by the Boston investigators, 25 had some kind of acute psychological disturbance within the preceding 24 hours. In 15 cases, the disturbance preceded the arrhythmia by only an hour. In one case, a Yankees fan watching his team go down to the Red Sox on TV got so worked up that his heart went into fibrillation.

But what good is life if you can’t get all worked up about it? The point to remember is that emotional stress of 10 minutes duration is usually harmful only if it has been preceded by years of unrelenting, chronic emotional stress.

2. Temperature Extremes: Hospital emergency room personnel have long known that the incidence of heart attacks increases during snow storms. Some researches suspects it may simply be the cold.

When you are cold, the blood vessels to the skin constrict so you can conserve body heat. Blood vessels to the heart may also constrict, cutting off the blood supply to the heart.

People with angina pectoris (heart related chest pains) may suffer increases in the number and severity of attacks just by exposure to cold. This can happen in hot weather, too, or under any circumstances that cause the blood vessels to the heart to constrict.

People with angina pectoris usually have a fixed blockage. That does not change. But if you increase the work of heart by constricting the vessels in another place, that may be enough to precipitate a heart attack.

3. The Heavy Evening Meal: When researchers examined the coroner’s reports o 100 sudden deaths of British men listed as victims of coronary artery disease, they found that about a quarter had died about an hour after eating. Although this particular investigation didn’t turn up any significant link to the fat content of men’s last meals, there is other evidence that a fat-laden mean can have devastating consequences on the cardiovascular system.

Study of arteriosclerosis in Los Angeles, once suggested adding the “heavy evening meal” to the risk factors for heart attacks and strokes. The park of digestion probably occurs during deep sleep periods, when the body is unable to move blood fats through the arteries quickly. In arteries already damaged by arthrosclerosis, it’s likely that those fats will help block already narrowed arteries. The result is a bottleneck – “an ideal situation” for platelets to clot.

4. Booze: The same British researchers, examining the same 100 coroner’s reports, also found that slightly less than a quarter of the people had been drinking alcohol shortly before they died.

In fact, investigator in Scotland, looking for acute triggers of sudden cardiac death, found that Saturday night and alcohol were the fatal combination. Other studies in this country have implicated binge drinking in sudden heart attack.

5. Monday Morning: Canadian researchers at the University of Manitoba discovered a curious statistic: of all the sudden cardiac death they studied, 75 percent occur on Monday, the first day of the week, as people returned to their jobs.

The group they studied consisted of 3983 men, all of whom had been found fit for pilot training. The men who had obvious clinical signs of heart disease might be stricken at any time during the week, the research team found. But those who did not have obvious disease almost always died suddenly, on Monday, at work.

Could Monday mornings be all that blue? Well, may be so. The researchers speculated that a person’s return to work after a weekend break might cause enough psychological stress to touch off an arrhythmia, the presumed cause of these sudden deaths.

6. Morning – Any Morning: Harvard cardiologist James E. Muller reports that heart attacks seem to have their own internal sense of timing. Of 847 heart attacks he studied, most had occurred between 6 a.m. and noon.

Dr Muller used information supplied by over 50 investigators nationwide to pinpoint the peak hours of cardiac arrest. His findings confirmed the work of researchers in Europe and the Soviet Union, who also found an early morning heart attack peak. It’s probably no coincidence that the 6 a.m. to noon period is when heart rate, arterial pressure and physical activity are also on the increase.

I firmly believe that the whole universe is inter-connected. Our body, mind and spirit are deeply rooted with each other. If body is sick, the mind cannot relax or feel good. And if mind is not relaxed, it will give birth to stress and that will lead to chronic health problems.

Stress Can Break Your Heart

Most of us heard about the relationship between diet and heart disease. We know that too much cholesterol and fat in the body can trigger a heart attack. What about unhappy thoughts, stress and the feeling that life is going against you? Does your thinking affect your heart’s health?

Put your left fist, thumb on top, up to your breast bone, slightly to the left of the centre. Squeeze your fist hard and rhythmically. Your heart beats like this, some 100,000 times a day pumping about four quarts of blood through your body minute (and much more when you are stressed or are exercising)

Put your fist back up against your breast bone, thumb up. Squeeze it as hard as you can, again and again. Imagine doing this all day long, year after year, for a lifetime.

Oxygen is not the only vital substance that the heart pumps through the body. Hormones secreted by the pituitary gland, by the adrenal glands, by the thyroid, and by other glands are carried to every cell in the body. So are the products of digestion, such as glucose, vitamins and enzymes.

Blood does not randomly flow through the body, of course. It flows systematically through a seemingly endless series of arteries and veins. When oxygen enriched blood leaves the heart, it flows through large arteries and smaller arteries, and then through the very small arterioles. The arterioles give way t the tiny capillaries. Only when the blood has reached capillaries does it exchange its oxygen for carbon dioxide. At this point, the blood begins its journey back to the heart. For capillaries to venules to veins, the blood flows through ever widening pipes back to the heart.

The arterial vessels carrying freshly oxygenated blood from the heart can be viewed as life giver in this ital exchange; they bring oxygen, nutrients,, hormones and other substances to the body’s tissues. The veins guiding the “used” blood back to the heart can be viewed as the garbage disposal part of the system.

The Simple Formula

In medical school, doctors learn a simple formula: blood Pressure = Cardiac output x arterial Resistance. This means that your blood pressure level depends on how much blood the heart pumps per unit of time (cardiac output) and how difficult it is for the blood to move through the “pipes” (arterial resistance).

If your heart starts beating faster than normal, its output has increased. And greater cardiac output means increased blood pressure. Your heart is trying to move the blood through the “pipes” faster, and much work harder to do so. When it does this, your blood pressure increases.

When you exercise, your cardiac output and your blood pressure increase. In a young, healthy person, this increase is nothing to worry about. Eventually, the arteries relax, expand in size, and your blood pressure drops to normal.

But stress can also increase your cardiac output; it can make your heart beat harder and faster. In fact, stress may be a major cause of elevated blood pressure. When we are stressed, we may feel like nothing is going right, like we’re going to blow the big job, like we’re always behind. We feel that people are standing in your way, or we’re upset about being caught in traffic. When we’re stressed, the brain stimulates the sympathetic nervous system. In turn, the sympathetic nervous system prompts the adrenal medulla (the inside part of the adrenal glands) to pump out adrenaline like substances. This is turning increases the heart rate, and the strength of the beat. In other words, your thought alone can lead to increased cardiac output, which leads to higher blood pressure.

There’s a certain part of the brain, the hypothalamus, which we call the “pilot” of the brain because it controls so many body processes. The hypothalamus sits right above the pituitary gland. When the hypothalamus “reads” your negative thoughts and other signs of stress, it tells the pituitary to release a hormone called ACTH (adrenocorticotrophic hormone). ACTH then flows to the adrenal glands, where it directs them to release a number of hormones including some 42 varieties of cortisone. Amount other things; these hormones cause your body to retain salt and water. More fluid in the bloodstream means more work for the heart.

When stress is chronic, the blood vessels constrict (“tighten up”). Remember the equation, Blood Pressure = Cardiac output x Arterial Resistance? When the “pipes” get smaller, it’s harder for the blood flow thought them. Arterial resistance is increased, which means blood pressure goes up. Additionally, chronic stress changes the chemistry of the blood, making it more likely to clot. This means there’s great chance that a clot will form and lodge in a narrow artery in the heart, and cause heart attack; or it may lodge in the brain and lead to a stroke.

Having some stress in our lives is probably all right and may be helpful if it prompts us to action. Chronic stress, however, is hard on the heart.

Blood pressure = Cardiac Output x Arterial Resistance. It’s a simple formula. If you keep your heart working at normal speed and strength, if the resistance to the flow of blood through the arteries remains normal, everything will be fine. But if stress sets in motion the series of events that kicks your heart into high gear, and causes fluid retention and contracted arteries, your blood pressure will go up.

Cholesterol and Stress

Put your fist back up to your chest. Look down at the back of your fist. See the veins that are just beneath the skin? Imagine that these are your coronary arteries that supply fresh, oxygen rich blood to the heart muscle. Some of these vital arteries are only as wide as the tip of a pencil.

Let’s suppose that you’ve been eating a high fat, cholesterol rich diet and that some of your coronary arteries have narrowed not fatally so: a 50 percent blockage in this artery, a 60 or 75 percent narrowing in that. You can do reasonably well these kinds of blockages, unless stress causes cholesterol levels in the body to rise. Many studies have verified the relationship between stress and elevated cholesterol. If you throw people into ice cold water, their cholesterol will rise. If you threaten them, tell they’re going be fired, or tell them that they must take a difficult test, their cholesterol will go up.

Stress and elevated cholesterol are intimately related. Chronic anger, fear, “hurry-itis”, feelings that you are a failure, that life is out to get you; these thoughts increase blood pressure and cholesterol. Such thoughts can shorten your life. Cholesterol is more likely to be normal in people who have a positive, cheerful, confident, outlook on life.

Stress in the workplace

Work can be major source of stress. Specialists in the field of work induced disability now know that certain jobs are inherently stressful. Police work and fire fighting, for example, are highly stressful jobs; other kinds of work can also be stressful. Whether we are factory workers, clerks, attorneys, or chairmen of major companies, we often find ourselves under tremendous stress at work, on the way to work, and at home when we’re thinking about work.

For most of us, work related stress falls into two categories work overload and role conflict.

Work Overload: There are two types of work overload: Quantitative or qualitative. Quantitative work overload has to be with numbers: too many things to do in the day, too many thin phone calls to makes, too many orders to fill, too many boards to nail, too many clients to see. Too many things to do, in too little time. How often they are rushing around at work, trying to get everything done, but never quite succeeding? What is this doing to your heart, your body chemistry, your peace of mind and your health?

Qualitative work overload, on the other hand, has to do with standards that you cannot meet. You are called upon to perform beyond your ability. This happens when people are improperly trained. Or, you may be well qualified for one job, but find yourself promoted or transferred to a job that you aren’t as skilled at. The stress and frustration of trying to perform a different kind of work or to perform at higher levels, lead to work overload, mental distress and often physical disease.

It doesn’t take much overload to damage the heart. A study in the April edition of The New England Journal of Medicine reported on patients with coronary artery disease. The patients were asked to perform mental arithmetic, to complete a certain color word task, to give a speech, and to read aloud. The stress from these everyday tasks was enough to cause well motion abnormalities in many of the patients. (Wall motion abnormalities have to do with the way the heart muscle squeezes to pump blood).

Quantitative or qualitative work overload causes definite biochemical changes in the body, especially with respect to cholesterol levels. Many studies have shown the relationship between work overload and heart attacks, high blood pressure, cardiovascular disease, and other potentially fatal disorders.

Role Conflict: Role conflict occurs when two or more pressures are in conflict with one another. It generates stress that causes mental distress, and man lead to actual physical disease. Research has shown that long tern role conflict leads certain people to experience high cholesterol, elevated blood pressure, obesity, heart disease and other medical problems.

Release valve

The steam engine is a marvelous invention. Coal is burned in the engine, a steam forms and the steam is used to activate the turbines. Seam engines do a lot of work, and they all have a safety valve, just in case too much steam builds up inside the engine. It’s a great idea: let off the excess steam rather than risk damaging the machinery.

In our houses, stores, office buildings and factories, all the electrical circuits have build in circuit breakers or fuses. When there is an electrical overload, the fuses automatically blow, putting an immediate end to the overload before it can cause any damage.

It would be nice if we had a safety valve that let off excess and inappropriate stress. We don’t have a safety valve, but our bodies give us warning signals when trouble is brewing, when we are overloaded, or in conflict. The warnings may be seemingly minor problems such as headaches, neck ache, backaches or, the waning may be in form of heaviness in the chest, heart palpitations, or high blood pressure. The latter are more serious warnings, and must b corrected right away. Unfortunately, we don’t have a safety valve, and sometimes our warnings come too late. We should reduce the stress n our lives before these warning signals occur.

Healthy Thoughts, Healthy Heart

Every year thousands of peoples have a heart attack. Although some survive, for others a fatal heart attack was their only warning that anything was wrong. Since stress is so intimately related for ways to keep our stress level as low as possible.

Some stressors can be dealt with easily; we can change our diet and stop smoking, for example. And we can take nutrients that help protect us against the effects of environmental pollution and chemicals in our foods. But what can we do about traffic, work overload and the like? What if we can’t find a new job, or move to a city where there is little traffic? How do we handle the stress?

We learn a lesson from Epictetus, The Roman Philosopher (A.D. 55-135) who said: “I am upset not by events, but rather by the way I view them.”

With the single statement, Epictetus gave us a “medicine” for many of our ills. If we can’t eliminate every stressor in our lives, we can change our attitudes. May be we have to take a major highway to work, and maybe it’s always crowded. We can’t change the traffic, but we can learn t change our thoughts about the traffic. You see, alone control your thoughts. You, and only you, determine what your thoughts will b, whether positive or negative.

You have absolute control over your thoughts, and every thought in your head influence your body, your immune system, and your health. Beat “thought disease” by changing you thoughts. Remember that stress and your thoughts have a profound influence on your heart. Your stomach isn’t the only thing tied in knots by stress. Help your heart by keeping your thoughts as healthy, positive, happy, and optimistic as possible. Even when things are going wrong, even if you are overloaded at work, fill your mind with healthy thoughts. Your healthy thoughts may not change your unhappy work situation, but they will most certainly help protect your heart from the ravages of stress.

We ‘humans’ have got the life a billion years ago. There have been five mass extinctions in earth’s history. We are living through the sixth. And now we too are running at a pace to end it all. This time it will be our fault.

The new discoveries and inventions have made our lifestyle full of convenience. But our bodies require work. Just like the sedentary water starts smelling, the sedentary lifestyle has given rise to many chronic diseases like the heart problems, diabetes and hypertension.

Today, the health researchers are suggesting that most of the chronic diseases that have appeared in man’s life are due to STRESS. From where it has come. It is the bi-product of our so-called modern lifestyle.

We are standing at the edge of cliff. Immediate actions are required to bring back the healthy days. We must incorporate exercise, balanced diet, sound sleep, and the most importantly happy and positive thoughts to our lifestyle to get rid of all health problems.

I believe “The opposite of great truth is also true.”

Day and Night, Work and Rest, Art and Science… they all looks opposite but my viewpoint is they compliment each other.

The more you relax, the more you active. Life is a balance between what we can and what we cannot. Learn to live between effort and surrender.